Black history a big part of Burlington's Heritage month.

News 100 redBy Staff

February 5th, 2019

BURLINGTON, ON

 

February is Heritage Month in Burlington.

union-burial-ghent-wife

Empire Loyalist Union cemetery in Aldershot. The Ghent’s were a significant family when Burlington was known as Wellington Square.

The City of Burlington’s Heritage Committee has been busy planning another exciting Heritage Month, Topics and events will include Black history, First Nations, Freeman Station, Burlington architecture, movies, panel discussions, stories and more. The full calendar listing is at bpl.on.ca and burlington.ca/calendar.

Mayor Marianne Meed Ward said: “Great cities aren’t made overnight. Our connections to the underground railroad, First Nations, the industrial revolution and, of course, our contributions to the great wars are well documented. Thanks to the efforts of the Burlington Heritage Month Committee and Heritage Burlington, they are also becoming well-told.”

Howard Bohan, Chair, Heritage Burlington had this to say:

“We are proud to offer such interesting and diverse historical and educational opportunities. Special thanks to the Burlington Heritage Month Committee and to Martha Hemphill of the United Empire Loyalists Association for her leadership.”

Black History Month is bringing the African and Caribbean immigrant experience to this city.

Ancilla Ho Young

Ancilla Ho Young takes part in an unveiling of noted Black citizens. She is with Mayor Meed Ward and an unidentified person.

Burlington Caribbean Connection, in partnership with the City of Burlington, Halton Regional Police Service, both Halton school boards and the Halton Multicultural Council, is staging its third annual Black History Month Celebrations with two events in February.

The play Once On This Island, is scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.) at Nelson High School.

Once On This Island is a Caribbean version of Hans Christian Anderson’s tale of the Little Mermaid. It’s described as a colourful musical tale of love, loss and redemption performed by a group of Caribbean peasants as they wait out a violent storm.

The story tells of a young peasant girl who leaves her village in search of her love. It is the peasants’ version of what became of her, filtered through faith and imagination, music, drama, love and race.

Admission to the event is free but a donation box will be available to help fund events for next year. If you would like to attend but did not receive an invitation, call 905-332-9098 to reserve a seat, or send an e-mail to: thebcc2000@yahoo.ca.

The Halton District School Board celebrates Black History Month as a tremendous opportunity for our students to learn more about, and for our schools to highlight, the very significant contributions Black Canadians have made to the very fabric of Canada,” says Stuart Miller, Director of Education for the Halton District School Board.

Viola ten dollar bill

The $10 bill was released by the Mint to celebrate the contribution Viola Desmond made to progress for Black people in the Maritimes. The Halton District School Board named a school after the woman

“In addition to the teaching that takes place all year, the month of February provides students even greater exposure and deeper learning into the many achievements of African Canadians. As a Board, we are so proud to have two of our elementary schools named after individuals who courageously stood up for civil rights in Canada (Viola Desmond PS) and bravely brought freedom to thousands of people escaping slavery through the Underground Railroad (James W. Hill PS).”

Some of the events taking place at Halton schools to celebrate Black History Month include:

• Robert Bateman HS (Burlington): Dwayne Morgan, a spoken word artist and motivational speaker, will visit the school on Feb. 21. He will conduct a Black History Jeopardy workshop where students can answer a series of Black History questions.

• Anne J. MacArthur PS (Milton): Students and staff will be led through a lively assembly on Feb. 5 by the organization Stay Driven, in which students and staff will learn about Black Canadian history.

• James W. Hill PS (Oakville): On Feb. 6, Inspiration Republic will host three performances at the school featuring the life stories of historical African Canadians: James W. Hill, Viola Desmond, Mary Ann Shadd, and Elijah McCoy.

• Ethel Gardiner PS (Halton Hills): On Feb. 7, Babarinde Williams will lead Grade 3-8 students and staff through a presentation about Black Canadian heroes. Kindergarten to Grade 2 students will participate in a drumming workshop, led by Williams.

Celebrating Black History Month aligns with the Equity and Well-being goals contained in the Halton District School Board’s Multi-Year Plan. The goal is to ensure every student learns in a respectful culture of high expectations that values diversity, and that students will see themselves reflected in their learning.

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1 comment to Black history a big part of Burlington’s Heritage month.

  • Richelle Papin

    You mention that the Burlington Caribbean Connection, in partnership with the City of Burlington, Halton Regional Police Service, both Halton school boards and the Halton Multicultural Council, is staging its third annual Black History Month Celebrations with two events in February. The first event is the play,Once On This Island, a Caribbean version of Hans Christian Anderson’s tale of the Little Mermaid. It’s described as a colourful musical tale of love, loss and redemption performed by a group of Caribbean peasants as they wait out a violent storm. What is the second event? The next paragraph describes the events taking place in the HDSB. Are these considered the second event? There is more than one event taking place at a number of schools. Please explain.

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